Event Registration - Indiana Psychological Association
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Broken Image IPA Live Webinar: Trauma and Addiction
10/20/17 - 10/20/17

"Trauma and Addiction"
Presented by Zachary Adams, PhD, HSPP
Live Webinar - Friday, October 20, 2017
12:00 - 1:00 PM Eastern Time

1 Category I CE will be awarded for full attendance and completion of a CE evaluation.

Registration is limited to 100 participants and closes on October 18th.
 
PLEASE NOTE: Registration is a two-step process!
  1. Register for the webinar with IPA by clicking the “register” button at the bottom of this page. Registrants will receive an email confirmation from IPA that contains a link to register with GoToWebinar.
  2. YOU MUST REGISTER with GoToWebinar to receive an active link to the webinar and instructions for joining the webinar on October 20th. This email confirmation will be sent directly from GoToWebinar.
*If you have problems registering with GoToWebinar, or do not receive the confirmation emails from them, please contact Tabitha Arnett at tabitha@indianapsychology.org or Lyndsi Moser at ceprograms.ipa@gmail.com.
 
“Trauma and Addiction”
Presented by Zachary Adams, PhD, HSPP – Indiana University School of Medicine
 
Trauma and substance use often co-occur in adolescents and adults. Although trauma-related mental health problems and substance use have typically been addressed in separate courses of treatment, there is increasing evidence that integrated treatments are safe, acceptable, and effective in addressing comorbid PTSD and substance use disorders (SUD). This webinar will provide a brief overview of the connections between trauma and substance use across the lifespan followed by a discussion of recent evidence related to treatments for co-occurring PTSD and SUDs.  Practical considerations for assessment and intervention will be discussed.
 
By attending this webinar, participants will be able to:
  1. Summarize multiple developmental pathways underlying co-occurring trauma and substance use
  2. Describe evidence for integrated treatments for PTSD and substance use in youth and adults
  3. Identify strategies for assessing and treating co-occurring PTSD and substance use
This intermediate presentation has a target audience of clinicians, residents, students, interns, and researchers.
 
Zachary Adams, PhD, HSPP
Dr. Adams is clinical psychologist and researcher with a primary appointment in the Department of Psychiatry at the Indiana University School of Medicine.  He works closely with colleagues in Psychiatry, Children's Health Services Research, Adolescent Medicine, Child Abuse Pediatrics, and other departments, as well as collaborators at Medical University of South Carolina, to improve the health and well-being of youth and families impacted by trauma and substance use. His clinical and research interests center on improving care and promoting healthy outcomes for young people with co-occurring mental health and substance use problems, with a particular emphasis on youth and families impacted by trauma and adversity.
 
Dr. Adams has no financial relationships to report.
Special Note to Conference Attendees
The Indiana Psychological Association (IPA) is approved by the American Psychological
Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Indiana Psychological Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
 
Indiana State Psychology Board and Indiana Behavioral Health Board:
  • IPA is an approved provider of Category I continuing education for psychologists.
  • IPA is an approved provider of Category I continuing education for LSW, LCSW, LMFT, LMHC, LMFTA, LCAC and LAC.
Licensees must judge the program’s relevance to their professional practice.

Please note that APA rules require that credit be given only to those who attend the entire workshop.  Those arriving more than 15 minutes after the scheduled start time or leaving early will not receive CE credits.  Partial credit cannot be given.

Licensees who attend the entire webinar and complete the evaluation form will receive a CE certificate via email.
Registration Fees
IPA Members - $20
Non-Members - $30
Students (Members) - $10
Students (Non-Members) - $10 (requires campus email address for verification)

Cancellations: 
IPA will provide refunds for registration cancellations made at least 10 days before the event.  No refunds will be given for cancellations fewer than 10 days before an event.  Contact the IPA office to confirm receipt of cancellation request. 
Download Event Flier (PDF)
Location: Live Webinar

Registration ends on October 18, 2017





Broken Image 2017 IPA Fall Conference & Annual Meeting
11/03/17 - 11/04/17

2017 IPA Fall Conference & Annual Meeting
Friday, November 3rd & Saturday, November 4th
Embassy Suites by Hilton Indianapolis North

Quick Links:
Friday - November 3
Saturday - November 4 - Psychologist & Student Tracks
Speaker Biographies
Registration Details/Cost
Hotel Location/Reservations
 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3rd 
Registration Check-In & Light Continental Breakfast: 7:30 AM - 8:00 AM
Welcome:  8:00 AM - 8:15 AM

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: 8:15 – 9:45 AM
“The Changing Face of the Practice of Psychology
Antonio E Puente, PhD
1.5 Category I CE
 
The unusual and unexpected changes in health care policy in recent years have significantly changed the practice of psychology. This presentation will begin with a brief history of healthcare in the US. The primary focus will be on how CMS, through the Current Procedural Terminology, shapes the practice of healthcare, and specifically psychology. Both diagnostic (and testing) as well as psychotherapy codes will be presented. If possible (depending on updated regulations), the emphasis will be on new testing codes. The challenges to current policy, ranging from the evolution of the Affordable Care Act, to this year’s bills from the House and Senate will be reviewed. Anticipated trends that will emerge as a function of new paradigms, such as MACRA, will be presented.
 
This intermediate presentation has been developed for clinicians, residents, interns, and students.
 
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Summarize the history of healthcare in the US
  2. Recognize the basic codes for interviewing, testing, and psychotherapy
  3. Apply the understanding of political pressure to the development of emerging healthcare policy
 
Refreshment Break & Visit Exhibitors: 9:45 AM - 10:00 AM
 
AM CONCURRENT SESSIONS: 10:00 – 11:30
 
SESSION A
“Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder- Implications for Diagnosis, Referral and Treatment”
Laura E. Boggs, PsyD, HSPP and Valerie J. Weesner, PhD, HSPP
1.5 Category I CE
 
Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) was introduced into the DSM-5 in October of 2015. It evolved from the DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of Feeding Disorder of Infancy or Early Childhood. The ARFID diagnostic criteria represent an attempt to conform to the DSM-5’s approach to diagnoses from a life span perspective. It addresses the fact that some eating disorders persist into late childhood, adolescence and adulthood. Feeding Disorder of Infancy or Early Childhood was minimal in its diagnostic criteria, including a feeding disturbance as manifested by persistent failure to eat adequately with significant failure to gain weight or significant loss of weight (not due to GI or other medical conditions and not better accounted for by another mental disorder) with onset prior to six years.  In contrast, Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder addresses several different types of eating disordered behavior from early childhood through adulthood.  Attendees will learn to distinguish the three types of Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder, including (1) Fear of negative consequences, (2) Selective or “picky” eating, and (3) Lack of interest in food. Attendees will also learn how Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder is similar to and differs from other eating disorders, including Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, Binge Eating Disorder, Other Specified Feeding and Eating Disorder and Pica. Case studies of children, adolescents and adults with ARFID will be used to elucidate characteristics of individuals with the three types of Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder and will also illustrate how treatment approaches derive from a combination of family based treatment for eating disorders, cognitive behavior therapy and behavioral strategies. Resources and recommendations for next steps will be also be discussed.
 
This introductory presentation has been developed for clinicians, residents, interns, and students.
 
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Distinguish the three types of Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID)
  2. Describe the difference between ARFID and other eating disorders
  3. Outline the basic treatment protocol for the three types of Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder
 
SESSION B
“Infant Mental Health and Reflective Practice”
Elesia Hines, PsyD, HSPP & Christine Raches, PsyD, HSPP, BCBA
1.5 Category I CE
 
The capacity for reflection is recognized as an essential component of competency for professionals working with very young children and their families. Regular opportunities to pause allow providers to reflect on the emotional content of their work and consider their role from a relationship perspective. This is best accomplished when providers have the support and insight from other professionals. This presentation will focus on the key components and principles of reflective practice in relation to working with infants, toddlers, and their families; these components include contemplation, self-awareness, curiosity, professional/personal development, parallel process, and emotional response. Although this presentation will focus on reflective practice as it pertains to infant mental health, professionals who work with clients of all ages and backgrounds will find these principles to be useful in their work.

Many writers have contended that reflective activities and process within the context of a reflective supervision/consultation relationship is a highly effective form of professional development that leads to reflective practice. Reflective supervision has been defined as "the shared exploration of the emotional content of infant and family work as expressed in relationships between parents and infants, parents and practitioners, and supervisors and practitioners." Presenters will discuss the need for providers to engage in reflective supervision/consultation. Presenters will also share information about infant mental health practice in the state of Indiana and ways providers can gain more expertise and training. Resources and recommendations for next steps will be discussed. Group activities to promote reflection will be incorporated throughout the presentation.

This introductory presentation has been developed for clinicians, residents, interns, and students.
 
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Recognize key components and principles of reflective practice.
  2. Define reflective supervision/consultation and how it differs from administrative supervision.
  3. Identify state and national resources in order to obtain additional training and expertise related to infant mental health and reflective practice.
 
SESSION C
“Ethical Dilemmas:  Strategies for Clarifying Ethical Conflicts and Generating Options for Resolution”
Shannon E. Woller, PsyD, ABPP, HSPP
1.5 Category I CE
 
Ethical dilemmas arise when two or more values come into conflict and are common occurrences in all facets of psychology.  However, despite being frequently encountered, ethical dilemmas can create significant amounts of distress, frustration, and circular thinking for those involved especially in situations that do not present immediately obvious solutions.  The purpose of this presentation is to provide psychologists with tools to help clarify the values in conflict when ethical dilemmas are identified, to write meaningful ethics questions that clearly summarize the dilemmas, and to generate options for ethical resolution of the dilemmas.  To achieve these aims, the presentation will first review a number of common values that come into conflict in psychology (e.g. beneficence and autonomy, confidentiality and duty to warn, and competence and non-maleficence). Next, a structured formula for generating ethics questions will be presented.  Lastly, the structured ethics questions will be used to guide information seeking and generation of alternatives for resolution of the conflict.   Examples provided during the presentation will cover clinical, teaching, and research aspects of psychology to show how these principles are applicable across the field.  By the end of the presentation, attendees will have practical and reproducible tools that they can use in their professional endeavors to clarify and resolve challenging ethical dilemmas.

This intermediate presentation has been developed for clinicians, researchers, residents, interns, and students.
 
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Identify values that are frequently in conflict in ethical dilemmas
  2. Identify the conflict of values and create a summarizing ethics question
  3. Generate justifiable resolutions for the ethical dilemma
 
Indiana Psychological Foundation (IPF) Reception & Visit Exhibitors: 11:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Awards Luncheon & Annual Meeting:  12:15 PM - 1:30 PM
Visit Exhibitors: 1:30 PM - 2:00 PM
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EARLY PM CONCURRENT SESSIONS: 2:00 – 3:30 PM
 
SESSION A
“Managing Concussion vs Post-Concussion Syndrome”
Christopher Sullivan, PhD, HSPP
1.5 Category I CE
 
Post-concussion syndrome (PCS) is a set of symptoms that persist beyond the generally accepted time frame for recovery from concussion. Attendees will learn what factors influence recovery from concussion vs recovery from post-concussion syndrome. Risk factors for persistent PCS will be identified along with current best practice for treating PCS.
 
This intermediate presentation has been developed for clinicians, researchers, residents, interns, and students.
 
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. State the differences between concussion and post-concussion syndrome
  2. Identify risk factors for a protracted recovery in concussed patients
  3. Identify risk factors for persistent post-concussion syndrome
  4. Incorporate multimodal assessment into treatment of post-concussion syndrome
 
SESSION B
“Family Based Interventions for Children Who Resist Post-Separation Parental Contact”
Randall Krupsaw, PhD, HSPP
1.5 Category I CE
 f
This presentation will address why children resist or refuse post-separation contact with a parent, the family-based treatment methods for handling such parent-child contact problems, and the collaboration that is needed between mental health professionals, lawyers, and judges for effective and child-focused treatment. The concepts that will be covered include parent-child affinity and alignment, justified rejection of a parent (realistic estrangement), parental alienation, restrictive gatekeeping, underlying cognitive distortion in the children and parents, the role of parental personality disorders and psychopathology, and common underlying dynamics in families with high inter-parental conflict and/or “tribal warfare.” Because parent-child contact problems are typically caused by various family as well as individual psychological issues, and because there problems can range from mild to severe, the treatment methods and collaborative strategies that will be covered include different outpatient models of family based reunification therapy, intensive educational and experiential residential treatment programs, parenting coordination and other court-ordered collaborations between mental health professionals, attorneys, judges, and the involved family members. The basic theme of this discussion will be that one size does not fit all. The intervention needs to be tailored to the individual needs of each family. In severe cases, outpatient reunification therapy is likely to be insufficient, and referral to cases, outpatient reunification therapy is likely to be insufficient, and referral to an intensive residential treatment program, with follow-up outpatient reunification therapy, may be warranted. The presentation will also cover methods for preliminary screening and subsequent clinical evaluation of referred cases, and appropriate communication between the therapists(s) and the family members, attorneys, and judge.
 
This intermediate presentation has been developed for clinicians.
 
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Summarize the basic conceptual foundation to explain children’s resistance in post-separation contact with a parent.
  2. Specify the basic treatment methods and legal strategies for handling parent-child contact problems.
  3. Explain how to choose the most appropriate intervention based on the nature and severity of the parent-child contact problem.
  4. Recognize the importance of ongoing court involvement and collaborative teamwork between the clinicians, the attorneys, and the judge.
 
SESSION C
“Early Memories as an Assessment Method”
Ashleigh Woods, PsyD, HSPP
1.5 Category I CE

This presentation will address a method of assessment useful in helping psychologists understand patients’ personalities and relationships. Projective assessment, in particular, is concerned with the broader study of the self in relation to the world/others. It helps identify key problem areas to make therapy more efficient and effective, especially balancing the constraints of insurance, patient finances, and schedules. Projective techniques give us more depth, helping us to understand the “person” beyond a symptom checklist.
 
Early memories have been used as a method of projective assessment since the early beginnings of “talk therapy,” including influences from Freud, Adler, and Mayman. Modern research in the neurobiology of memory provides an additional layer of understanding early memories, teaching us that what is remembered is not always factual. Many cognitive heuristics are in play, and we know that emotion plays a large role in the specific events that are remembered and how they are remembered. We remember selectively and our memories are “screened” so that some facts are more prominent and others are minimized or ignored according to our defenses and biases.
 
Early memories are important in terms of relational paradigms: our memories will conform to and confirm our representations of self and others, and these object relations play out in daily situations. In other words, who we are now determines what we will recall about situations later. This information can be enormously useful during the course of assessment and psychotherapy.
 
This introductory presentation has been developed for clinicians, researchers, residents, interns, and students.
 
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Identify at least three theorists central to the development of the Early Memories Test.
  2. Describe the basic underlying mechanisms of the neurobiology of memory.
  3. Describe the application of the Early Memories Test to your own work with patients.

Refreshment Break & Visit Exhibitors: 3:30 PM - 3:45 PM

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LATE PM CONCURRENT SESSIONS: 3:45 – 5:15 PM
 
SESSION A
“Caring for the Caregiver: Compassion Fatigue and the Health Professional”
Kimberly Morris, PhD, HSPP
1.5 Category I CE
 
Joinson (1992) coined the term “compassion fatigue” to describe the ways in which providing care to hurting people can harm the emotional, psychological, and physical well-being of caregivers.  Compassion Fatigue symptoms are unique and individualized but can include fear, anxiety, guilt, appetite and sleep disturbance, aches and pains, low motivation, absenteeism, and spiritual crises (Linnerooth, Mrdjenovich, & Moore, 2011). Researchers have found that Compassion Fatigue is a common stressor for Psychologists, especially those who are new to the profession and those who work with traumatized populations ( e.g., Linnerooth, Mrdjenovich, & Moore, 2011; de Figueiredo, Yetwin, Sherer, Radzik, & Iverson, 2014; Thompson, Amatea, & Thompson; Bearse, McMinn, Seegobin, & Free, 2013; Merriman, 2015). Providers who are unable to access empathic qualities and who begin to emotionally distance themselves from their clients can negatively affect patient care, leading investigators to conclude that Compassion Fatigue is “a threat to ethical practice” (in Negash & Sahin, 2011; Ray, Wong, White, & Heaslip, 2013; Lachman, 2016). Given the barriers that exist for psychologists to receive treatment for any type of mental health problem, it seems imperative to create prevention programs that help to preserve the provider’s emotional well-being and ability to function (Merriman, 2015).
 
This introductory presentation has been developed for clinicians, researchers, residents, interns, and students.
 
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Recognize the differences between Compassion Fatigue, Burn-out, Secondary Traumatic Stress, and Vicarious Traumatization
  2. Gain exposure to the current literature regarding Psychologists and compassion fatigue
  3. Summarize how Compassion Satisfaction may ward off symptoms of Compassion Fatigue
  4. Explain how supervision and other support systems assist in the management of compassion fatigue
  5. Develop strategies for avoiding symptoms of compassion fatigue which will prevent poor performance on the job
 
SESSION B
“The Treatment of Clients with Sensory Impairment: A Lifespan Approach”
Elizabeth L. Begyn, PhD, HSPP and Amy Letteri, PhD
1.5 Category I CE
 
There are many ethical, legal, and treatment considerations involved in working with individuals with vision and hearing impairments. These considerations can be overwhelming if the clinician is not adequately informed and prepared. The visually impaired population is a heterogenous group; it is important for clinicians to explore the etiology of vision loss, age of onset of vision loss, and the degree of vision loss when working with this population. In individuals with hearing loss, clinicians must consider communication preference and competency in addition to culture and identity. In communities with a dearth of mental health resources, it is important for clinicians to be able to arm themselves with as much training and knowledge as possible to be able to effectively treat individuals with sensory impairments as clinicians experienced with such populations may not be available. This presentation will review the basics of competent treatment in these populations with a focus on:  characteristics of visually impaired/blind and deaf populations; considerations for competent, valid, and sensitive assessment practices across the lifespan; psychological and social implications; evidence based treatment guidelines; and functional impact in educational, vocational, and social environments. Practitioners will also be provided with additional resources to support their practice with individuals with vision and hearing impairments.

This introductory presentation has been developed for clinicians.
 
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Identify common etiologies and presentations across the lifespan in vision and hearing impairment including, descriptions of function at different levels of impairments, prevalence rates, common etiologies, and available treatment for sensory impairment.
  2. Identify limitations in standardized assessment practices and considerations when interpreting test data.As well as, appropriate accommodations and modifications.
  3. Identify psychological and social considerations in visual and hearing impaired populations and understand basic evidence based practice for psychotherapeutic and vocational
 
SESSION C
“Biopsychosocial Perspectives on Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders: History, Assessment, Diagnosis and Evidence-Based Treatments”
Elizabeth N. Andresen, PhD, HSPP; Nicholas Jenkins, MD; Sarah C. Jenkins, PhD, HSPP; Megan Orr, PsyD, HSPP
1.5 Category I CE
 
Sociological studies have delineated the occurrence of mass hysteria throughout history and into the modern era. Events such as the Dancing Plague of 1518, Tanganyika Laughter Epidemic of 1962, and the LeRoy Students of 2012 provide fascinating insight into the societal interconnectedness and power of the mind-body connection. Traditionally viewed as evidence of spiritual or metaphysical attacks, mass hysteria is now better understood through sociological and psychological frameworks. However, few healthcare providers, psychologists included, receive adequate training in the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of such disorders.
 
Techniques for the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of somatic symptom and related disorders have evolved. In medicine and psychology alike, researchers and clinicians have sought to develop and refine ways of assessing and diagnosing these disorders. Physicians have been encouraged to acknowledge the limited scope of the biomedical model and their competence, while psychologists are encouraged to seek the best evidence-based treatments available to address such needs. Use of the biopsychosocial model is much more appropriate for such complex disorders, but also requires medical providers and mental health providers to work collaboratively in the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of somatic symptom and related disorders.
 
In this presentation, attendees will learn about the historical significance of mass hysteria and the evolution of the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of somatic symptom and related disorders in children and adults. A physician, clinical health psychologist, clinical psychologist, and lifespan neuropsychologist will present and contribute to the conversation.
 
This introductory presentation has been developed for clinicians, residents, interns, and students.
 
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Summarize the history of hysteria and somatic-related disorders
  2. Discuss the complex process of assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of Somatic Symptom and related disorders
  3. Identify diagnostic criteria for Somatic Symptom and related disorders
 
Check-Out: 5:15 PM

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4TH
Student Poster Set-Up: 7:15 AM - 7:30 AM
Registration Check-In: 7:30 AM - 8:00 AM
Welcome:  8:00 AM - 8:15 AM
Integrated Healthcare Workshop Part 1: 8:15 AM – 9:45 AM
Refreshment Break & Visit Posters: 9:45 AM – 10:30 AM
Integrated Healthcare Workshop Part 2: 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Lunch & Student Poster Awards: 12:00 PM – 12:45 PM
Integrated Healthcare Workshop Part 3: 12:45 PM – 2:15 PM
Refreshment Break: 2:15 PM – 2:30 PM
Integrated Healthcare Workshop Part 4: 2:30 PM – 4:00 PM
Check-Out: 4:00

STUDENT TRACK
Student Track (Saturday) (PDF)
 
PSYCHOLOGIST/PROFESSIONALS TRACK
APA INTEGRATED HEALTHCARE WORKSHOP
D. Douglas Tynan, PhD, ABPP
American Psychological Association
6.0 Category I CE (attendance at Part 1 thru 4 required to obtain CE credit)
 
The current U.S. healthcare system distinctly separates medical and behavioral health services, which has not served those with behavioral health challenges well. Factors of culture, race and ethnicity, stigma, and access, often are barriers to seeking specialty behavioral health treatment. In fact, the majority of the U.S. population seeks – and receives -- this treatment from their primary care providers. The integrated primary care model combines medical and behavioral health services for the range of issues patients bring to primary care. This course defines the integrated primary care model and its benefits to patients, and discusses the benefits and challenges of the collaborative relationship between medical and behavioral health providers. It explores the psychologist’s role in primary care and suggests ways that behavioral health pro might prepare to work in an integrated primary care practice.
 
Basic topics covered include the structure of the patient centered medical home, essential screening approaches used for behavioral difficulties, recommended intervention strategies, communication with the medical team, as well as cultural and ethical issues that arise working in an integrated care setting.
 
This intermediate presentation has been developed for clinicians, researchers, residents, interns, and students.
 
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Explain how psychologists add value to team-based healthcare and the patient-centered medical home, assisting in the achievement of the quadruple aim
  2. Identify how social determinants of health impact patient outcomes and how integrated primary care serves to reduce health disparities via population-based care
  3. Discuss the collaboration/integration continuum of behavioral health and medical care, identifying current level of collaboration and strategies to become more integrated
  4. Describe how primary care-based behavioral health assessment differs from specialty mental health assessment with a focus on population screening, measurement-based care, and functional assessment
  5. Describe how primary care-based behavioral health intervention differs from specialty mental health care with a focus on SBIRT, consultation, and appropriate documentation
  6. Explain how cultural differences impact health and specific ways behavioral health providers can provide culturally competent integrated behavioral health care
  7. Identify three ethical challenges that present in co-located and integrated primary care settings and strategies psychologists can use to mitigate these challenges
  8. Self-evaluate current competencies related to IPC knowledge, skills, and attitudes and identify needs for additional training and means of obtaining such training

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SPECIAL NOTE TO CONFERENCE ATTENDEES
The Indiana Psychological Association (IPA) is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Indiana Psychological Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • Indiana State Psychology Board and Indiana Behavioral Health Board: IPA is an approved provider of Category I continuing education for psychologists. IPA is an approved provider of Category I continuing education for LSW, LCSW, LMFT, LMHC, LMFTA, LCAC and LAC.
  • Licensees must judge the program’s relevance to their professional practice.
Please note that APA rules require that credit be given only to those who attend the entire workshop(s). Those arriving more than 15 minutes after the scheduled start time or leaving early will not receive CE credits. Partial credit cannot be given.
 
All licensees requesting Category I CE credits will receive a certificate from IPA confirming the number of credits earned. These certificates will be delivered via email approximately 2-6 weeks after the conference.


Presenter Biographies (Friday/Saturday) (PDF)

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CONFERENCE LOCATION
Embassy Suites by Hilton Indianapolis North
3912 Vincennes Road
Indianapolis, IN 46268
Phone: (317) 872-7700
Discount Code:  IPA (use when reserving a room by phone)
Online Reservations
 
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REGISTRATION
Registration includes a light continental breakfast and lunch.
 
Cancellation/Refund Policy: IPA will provide refunds for registration cancellations made at least 10 days before the event minus a $25 cancellation fee.  No refunds will be given for cancellations fewer than 10 days before an event.
 
Early Bird Pricing in BOLD; Ends October 13th

Members: Login to view the Member-Only pricing. Guest rates are displayed to those not logged-in as Members.

Non-members:  Submit membership application online by October 11th to be considered for membership in October, then pay dues upon acceptance (on/after October 25) to register for the Fall Conference at the Member discounted rate.  Contact the IPA offie for details.

 
Early Bird Pricing in BOLD*; ends October 13th

MEMBERS: Friday Only
$210 IPA Members*
$230 IPA Members
$165 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)*
$185 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)
 
MEMBERS: Saturday Only
$170 IPA Members*
$190 IPA Members
$135 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)*
$155 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)
 
MEMBERS: Friday & Saturday
$285 IPA Members*
$310 IPA Members
$275 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)*
$295 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)
 
NON-MEMBERS: Friday Only
$355 Psychologists & Other Professionals*
$375 Psychologists & Other Professionals
$310 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)*
$330 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)
 
NON-MEMBERS: Saturday Only
$315 Psychologists & Other Professionals*
$335 Psychologists & Other Professionals
$280 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)*
$300 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)
 
NON-MEMBERS: Friday & Saturday
$430 Psychologists & Other Professionals*
$455 Psychologists & Other Professionals
$420 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)*
$440 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)
 
STUDENTS: Prices for One or Two Days
ONE DAY
$45 Members*
$55 Members
$80 Non-Members*
$90 Non-Members
 
TWO DAYS
$50 Members*
$60 Members
$85 Non-Members*
$95 Non-Members

Early Bird Pricing in BOLD*; ends October 13th

Non-members:  Submit membership application online by October 11th to be considered for membership in October, then pay dues upon acceptance (on/after October 25) to register for the Fall Conference at the Member discounted rate.  Contact the IPA offie for details.

Members must login (through Registration link) to receive the Members discount.

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Location: Embassy Suites by Hilton Indianapolis North
3912 Vincennes Road
Indianapolis, IN




CANCELLATION/REFUND POLICY
IPA will provide refunds for registration cancellations made at least 10 days before the event minus a $25 cancellation fee. No refunds will be given for cancellations fewer than 10 days before an event.

Early Bird Pricing Ends October 13th.



Broken Image 2017 IPA Fall Conference Exhibitors & Sponsors
11/03/17 - 11/04/17

2017 IPA Fall Conference & Annual Meeting
Friday, November 3rd & Saturday, November 4th


EXHIBITORS & SPONSORS

Early Registration Discount Deadline: October 5, 2017
 

Exhibitor/Sponsor Invitation Packet (PDF)

Dessert & Reception Sponsors (PDF)

Members must login (through Registration link) to receive the Members discount.  Membership is specific to an individual Psychologist, Emeritus, or Affiliate membership. 

9/6/2017 Update: 
  • Fall Conference Program Back Cover Ad - Reserved (pending payment)

Location: Embassy Suites Indiananpolis North
3912 Vincennes Road
Indianapolis, IN 46268

Registration ends on October 18, 2017



Nature of Relationship: Acceptance by IPA of an application as an exhibitor or sponsor shall neither entitle the sponsor to an exclusive sponsorship arrangement with respect to any service or product offered by sponsor, nor constitute an endorsement of any service or product offered by sponsor.