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Webinar: Diversity Considerations for Treatment of Children and Adolescents
10/19/18

IPA 2018 Webinar Series
 

1.0 Hour of Category I CE credit
October 19, 2018 at Noon


Registrants will receive further information on registering with GoToWebinar for the presentation.

Diversity Considerations for Treatment of Children and Adolescents

Developing a sense of cultural competency is a journey that can span throughout an entire professional career. Diversity issues can be complicated and difficult to identify and address when treating adults, children, and families. In this presentation, we will focus on identifying the numerous diversity factors to consider when treating children and adolescents.

The primary goal of this presentation is to raise clinicians’ awareness for identifying such issues and effectively addressing them in treatment. In addition, we will focus on how clinical presentations may vary due to diversity issues. Another goal of the presentation will be to openly discuss how our personal social and cultural biases may impact our experience when diagnosing and treating children and adolescents. A variety of diversity issues will be explored from theoretical, clinical, professional, and personal perspectives.


Learning Objectives

By completing this program, participants will able to:

  1. Identify diversity issues that impact treatment with children and adolescents.
  2. Recognize the impact of diversity issues on clinical presentation.
  3. Summarize methods to address diversity issues in therapy.
  4. Critique their own perceptions of diversity issues in their clinical work.

Presenter: Aashia Bade, PhD, HSPP

Dr. Aashia M. Bade is a licensed clinical psychogist practicing in Indianapolis, Indiana. She earned her undergraduate degree at Northwestern University. Dr. Bade obtained both her Master's and Doctorate degrees in Clinical Psychology from Indiana State University. She has worked in various clinical settings including a pediatric inpatient psychiatric hospital, community mental health centers, and juvenile correctional facilities.

Dr. Bade is currently the Regional Director of Mental Health for Wexford of Indiana, supervising the mental health services for Indiana Department of Corrections. She is also the owner for AMB Psychological Health.


Dr. Bade has extensive experience providing individual and family therapy for children, adolescent, and adults with a range of diagnoses. Her primary clinical focus is treating children and adolescents with severe externalizing and internalizing psychopathology.  She utilizes a multisystemic approach to address the various clinical issues that may arise when working with patients.


Special Note to Conference Attendees
The Indiana Psychological Association (IPA) is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Indiana Psychological Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
 
Indiana State Psychology Board and Indiana Behavioral Health Board:
  • IPA is an approved provider of Category I continuing education for psychologists.
  • IPA is an approved provider of Category I continuing education for LSW, LCSW, LMFT, LMHC, LMFTA, LCAC and LAC.
Licensees must judge the program’s relevance to their professional practice.
 
Please note that APA rules require that credit be given only to those who attend the entire workshop.  Those arriving more than 15 minutes after the scheduled start time or leaving early will not receive CE credits.  Partial credit cannot be given.
 
Licensees who attend the entire webinar and complete the evaluation form will receive a CE certificate via email.
 
Registration Fees
IPA Members - $0
Non-Members - $30
 


 







2018 IPA Fall Conference & Annual Meeting
11/02/18 - 11/03/18


2018 IPA Fall Conference & Annual Meeting
Friday, November 2nd & Saturday, November 3rd 
Embassy Suites by Hilton Noblesville Indianapolis Conference Center

Quick Links:
Friday - November 2
Saturday - November 3
Speaker Biographies
Hotel Location/Reservations
Registration Details/Cost
 -- Register button at very bottom of this page

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2nd  

REGISTRATION CHECK-IN & CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST: 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM, WATERS CONFERENCE CENTER LOBBY
Welcome:  8:15 AM - 8:30 AM


KEYNOTE ADDRESS: 8:30 – 10:00 AM, ROOM: WATERS A
“The Role of Psychologists in Providing Quality Care In Our Communities”
Barbara Van Dahlen, Ph.D., President and Founder, Give an Hour

1.5 Category I CE
 
Presentation Description
Dr. Barbara Van Dahlen, the Founder and President of Give an Hour, will discuss the inspiration behind and the development of Give an Hour, a national non profit organization that provides free mental health care to those in need. The organization’s mission is to develop networks of skill-based volunteer professionals capable of responding to both acute and chronic conditions prevalent within society. Since 2005, the non profit organization has provided free mental health services to U.S. service members, veterans, and their families.  In 2015, Give an Hour expanded efforts to address the mental health needs of other populations including at risk teens, survivors of gun violence, victims of human trafficking and those affected by natural and man-made disasters. Also in 2015, Give an Hour launched its signature public health initiative, the Campaign to Change Direction focused on changing the culture of mental health. As a result of the popularity of its model and the reach of the Campaign to Change Direction, Give an Hour is now working internationally to provide information and services to address the needs of those who are in emotional pain around the world. Through the generosity, compassion, and expertise of Give an Hour’s skilled volunteers, Give an Hour is increasing the likelihood that those in need receive the support and care they deserve. Thus far, the U.S. network of nearly 7,000 licensed mental health professionals have provided over 265,000 hours of care and support.
 
This intermediate presentation has been developed for clinicians, residents, interns, and students.
 
Learning Objectives
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Recognize the unique mental health needs of those returning from military service and how non traditional modes of providing care and support has been an effective form of care for this population.
  2. Recognize how non traditional models of delivering mental health care and support are effective in addressing the unmet mental health needs in our communities.
  3. Describe how volunteer opportunities strengthen social connections, build cohesive communities, and enhance civic engagement.
  4. Discuss the effectiveness of a public health approach in countering the negative views of mental illness and those who are struggling with mental health challenges and substance abuse.
     

REFRESHMENT BREAK & VISIT EXHIBITORS: 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM
 
MORNING CONCURRENT SESSIONS: 10:30 – 12:00
  
MORNING SESSION ONE, ROOM: WATERS B
“Aquired Brain Injury: Managing A Chronic Condition”
Summer Ibarra, Ph.D., HSPP
Wendy Waldman, BSW, CBIST
1.5 Category I CE
 
Presentation Description
Brain injury is a lifelong chronic condition that is frequently unrecognized.  Every 9 seconds, someone in the United States sustains a brain injury. More than 3.5 million children and adults sustain an acquired brain injury (ABI) each year, but the total incidence is unknown. 

In this presentation, participants will gain an understanding of the epidemiology of brain injury and the common issues that happen after brain injury including cognitive, physical and emotional/behavioral effects. We will also focus on strategies, accommodations and interventions specific to the most common challenges individuals with brain injury face.

Because BI is so often unrecognized, screening for the lifetime exposure to brain injury is critical clinically to ensure appropriate referral and treatment. During this session, participants will learn to use a screening measure to identify various types of potential ABI which may then lead the individual to be formally diagnosed. In cases where there is a brain injury causing debilitation in some aspect, therapists may be able to more easily tailor that individual’s treatment and/or rehabilitation which can then can jumpstart recovery and healing.

While ABI is a chronic, lifelong condition, new interventions exist today that show promise in managing it. Participants will learn about appropriate access to medical care and medical professionals as well as rehabilitation services and professionals that can minimize and treat complications and optimize function in these individuals. We will explore strategies for supporting individuals with ABI including services, supports and resources for assisting them to return to school, work and reintegrate back into their community.

This introductory presentation has been developed for clinicians, residents, interns, and students.
 
Learning Objectives
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Discuss the epidemiology of brain injury and the common issues that happen after brain injury including cognitive, physical, and emotional/behavioral effects.
  2. Apply the screening measure to identify various types of potential acquired brain injury (ABI).
  3. Access appropriate medical care and medical professionals as well as rehabilitation services and professionals that can minimize and treat complications and optimize function in these individuals.
 
MORNING SESSION TWO, ROOM: WATERS C
“Young Adults With ASD: Helping the Families That Help Them”
Sandra Burkhardt, Ph.D., ABPP
David R. Parker, Ph.D.
1.5 Category I CE
 
Presentation Description
Families of young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) experience the challenge of trying to launch their loved ones toward independence while providing strategic supports related to the core deficits of ASD. The presentation provides evidence-based information and practical approaches to guide and empower clinicians who encounter young adults with ASD and their families. Setting realistic goals, assessing functional living skills and securing needed accommodations at home, at school, at work and in the community will be discussed. The Autism Society of American reports that 35 percent of young adults (ages 19-23) with autism have not had a job or received postgraduate education after leaving high school. (Shattuck et al., 2012).

This introductory presentation has been developed for clinicians, residents, interns, and students.
 
Learning Objectives
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Identify realistic goals and expectations to assist families of young adults with ASD in making the transition to young adulthood.
  2. Determine appropriate levels of supports needed for young adults with ASD.
  3. Provide compassionate, informed psychoeducational interventions and resources for families of young adults with ASD, including coping strategies for caregivers.

MORNING SESSION THREE, ROOM: WATERS D
“The Science, Craft, and Art of Evidence Based Psychotherapy Practice”
Stewart E. Cooper, Ph.D., HSPP, ABPP
Lynn F. Bufka, Ph.D.

1.5 Category I CE
 
Presentation Description
“Evidence-based practice is the integration of the best available research with clinical expertise in the context of patient characteristics, culture and preferences.” (APA 2005). The purpose of EBPP is to promote effective psychological practice and enhance public health by applying empirically supported principles of psychological assessment, case formulation, therapeutic relationship, and intervention Sackett and colleagues (2000). After sharing a pictorial model that helps the participants visualize the above three legged stool, this presentation will cover the overlap and distinctions between professional practice guidelines and clinical guidelines along with the differential values of each of these as well as the contexts of their respective development. Professional practice guidelines approved by APA have focused on areas such as multicultural practice, child custody evaluations and treatment of gay, lesbian and bisexual clients. Some of these guidelines address psychological practice with particular populations (e.g., older adults) and others particular areas (e.g., parenting coordination) without focusing on specific disorders or treatments. In contrast, clinical practice guidelines provide specific recommendations about treatment and clinical matters for particular disorders and conditions. Thus far, two clinical practice guidelines, one on PTSD and another on the family treatment of children and adolescents with obesity have been approved by APA. The presentation will also cover the main points from the document, Placing Clinical Practice Guidelines in Context by the American Psychological Association Advisory Steering Committee for Development of Clinical Practice Guidelines.

The presentation will then focus on challenges in the development of EBPP. These include the need for many approaches to psychology to conduct the types of research required to become part of a professional practice guideline or a clinical guideline. It also includes a brief overview of the recently approved revision of the APA Multicultural Guidelines An Ecological Approach to Context, Identity, and Intersectionality as to enhance cultural adaptation along with concepts and tools from context-responsive psychotherapy integration (Constantino et al, 2013). Adaptation for clinically complex cases will also be covered.

This intermediate presentation has been developed for clinicians, researchers, residents, interns, and students.
 
Learning Objectives
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Restate the three cornerstones of evidence-based practice.
  2. Distinguish between professional practice and clinical guidelines.
  3. Identify challenge areas in advancing evidence-based psychotherapy practice.  

LUNCHEON & ANNUAL MEETING:  12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

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EARLY AFTERNOON CONCURRENT SESSIONS: 1:30 – 3:00 PM

EARLY AFTERNOON SESSION ONE, ROOM:  WATERS A
“The Transition From High School to Adulthood”
Elizabeth Begyn, Ph.D., HSPP, ABPP
Kate Kingery, Ph.D.

1.5 Category I CE
 
Presentation Description
The transition from high school to adulthood represents a time of tremendous uncertainty for many families and young adults. In both assessment and psychotherapeutic interactions, families often request assistance navigating through this transitional period. This presentation aims to summarize research on the predictors of educational and vocational success in the post high school period and review ways psychological and cognitive assessments can be used to inform this transition. Additionally, ways to support individuals when there is a misalignment between their cognitive and psychological profile and their desired profession will be discussed, including how to help a young adult attain career satisfaction even when the job is not what they initially expected. Resources available to providers working with transitional age will also be highlighted. 
 
This intermediate presentation has been developed for clinicians, researchers, residents, interns, and students.
 
Learning Objectives
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Describe how assessment can be used to inform the post high school transition.
  2. Summarize research on the predictors of college/training program/career success. 
  3. Recognize and be able to utilize ways to support young adults when there is a misalignment between their cognitive and psychological profile and their desired profession.
  4. Utilize resources available to providers working with transitional age young adults.
 
EARLY AFTERNOON SESSION TWO, ROOM:  WATERS B
“The Exercise Potential:  In the Long Run”
Jim Schroeder, Ph.D.
1.5 Category I CE
 
Presentation Description
From the beginning of time, we have been a people of movement. Migrating out of the Great Rift Valley in East Africa where the earliest human remains exist, we have always moved out of necessity and out of leisure.  Whether hunting for prey, searching for food, or dancing in jubilation, we are a people whose activity has defined much of who we are, and where we will go (and have been).  Up until the last couple of hundred years, physical activity generally occurred because it was a requirement to live and love the way we were called.  But the industrial, and most recently technological revolution, have redefined when and how and why we move as modern conveniences have removed much of the demand that once existed.  Gone are the days of our ancestors when the average person reportedly walked up to 12 miles a day simply to survive.  Now some barely need to walk a few hundred yards to get through their day.
 
With the advent of a more sedentary life and a plethora of calorie rich, tasty, and inexpensive foods, exercise has never been more important for our livelihood. Yet as I will detail more in the presentation, many still find themselves falling woefully short of what they need to both survive and thrive, and it is causing serious health and relational concerns across many areas. The key to changing this appears to be understanding the core, individual reasons why this is the case, and then using this information, and the process of motivational interviewing, to develop clear strategies to help people initiate and sustain activity for the long run.  The presentation will utilize an empirical and experiential approach to look deeper and more broadly at the topic of exercise, and consider just why movement is so vital to our species and how we can encourage all people to move more, and in different ways.  
 
This intermediate presentation has been developed for clinicians.
 
Learning Objectives
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Describe the psychological, social, and physical benefits of exercise.
  2. Explore the main reasons people do not exercise regularly, or at all.
  3. Discuss possible solutions for increasing exercise in patients and the general population. 
 
EARLY AFTERNOON SESSION THREE, ROOM: WATERS C
“Ethics & Multicultural Competence: Not-So-Distant Cousins in Clinical Mental Health Practice”
Stephanie J. Cunningham, Ph.D., HSPP
1.5 Category I CE

Program Description
Sensitivity to multicultural issues is an ethical obligation for psychologists, as is the mandate to maintain competence in the professional services we provide. Multicultural competence in clinical practice is particularly important because of its potential effect on the therapeutic alliance and client outcomes. Although multicultural counseling has become a greater area of emphasis in graduate training in the allied mental health care fields over the past decade, this area of competence necessitates unending professional – and personal – development. Without post-graduate ongoing professional development it is easy to lose familiarity with theoretical models for multiculturally competent practice and the current literature base about best practices for serving diverse populations.  Similarly, the personal awareness that is crucial for competent clinical practice with diverse clients can atrophy without regular self-reflection and active engagement. True multicultural competence must be cultivated and maintained, just as we would with any other facet of our professional skill set; it is not something that can or should remain static. 

Failure to engage with multicultural competence in an active, ongoing way does a disservice to our clients.  Maintaining licensure as a psychologist specifically requires continuing education in ethics, presumably for the same reason: ethics are core to our practice, require continual self-reflection, and can easily cause harm to our clients if potentially problematic behaviors go unnoticed or ignored.  This parallel between ethics and multicultural competence reflects an interesting overlap between these elements of professional practice, which have more in common than we might notice at first glance.  As such, this workshop will present the case for the often-overlooked ties between these aspects of our discipline and offer participants the opportunity to reflect on how these come together in our clinical practice.  This will include review of what it means to be multiculturally competent (including current theoretical models and operationalization of cultural competency skills), exploration of the philosophical similarities that underpin our discipline’s understanding of cultural and ethical competencies, and guided activities intended to help participants gain greater self-insight into how these competencies intersect with our own individual experiences and personal values.  The final portion of the workshop will include discussion and application of an ethical decision-making model that intentionally incorporates multicultural issues into the process of parsing ethical dilemmas.
 
This introductory presentation has been developed for clinicians, researchers, residents, interns, and students.
 
Learning Objectives
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Describe the current state-of-the-art theoretical model for conceptualizing multiculturally competent mental health care practice.
  2. Summarize the basis of the claim for a fundamental connection between multicultural competency and ethical clinical practice.
  3. Apply a practical ethical decision-making model that explicitly addresses and incorporates multicultural concerns into the process of parsing ethical dilemmas.

REFRESHMENT BREAK & VISIT EXHIBITORS: 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM
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LATE AFTERNOON CONCURRENT SESSIONS: 3:30 – 5:00 PM
 
LATE AFTERNOON SESSION TWO, ROOM:  WATERS B
“Addressing the Dynamics of Pregnancy & Childbirth in Clinical Practice”
Maria P. Hanzlik, PsyD, HSPP
Jill Fodstad, PhD, HSPP, BCBA-D
Crystal Ramos, PsyD, HSPP
Noah Spring, Psy.D., HSPP, NRHSP

1.5 Category I CE 
 
Presentation Description
Prior to licensure, psychologists-in-training are required to obtain an inordinate number of hours of didactic and practical experience in assessment and treatment of clients; developing and applying research; teaching; and provision of supervision. As a result, some psychologists choosing to have children may not attempt this process until after licensure and are faced with the challenges of maintaining practice responsibilities while navigating their own or a partner’s pregnancy, immediate postpartum period, and return to work following the birth of a child. This workshop will focus on what the literature indicates, as well as practical application, about planning for the birth of a child while navigating practice as well as how to manage the effect on clients in therapy and assessment settings. This panel discussion will approach these issues from the perspectives of female and male psychologists working in group and solo private practice, neuropsychological private practice, and in a large academic health facility. This workshop will incorporate didactic presentation with an opportunity for a discussion/question and answer period during the last 10-15 minutes of the presentation.This introductory presentation has been developed for clinicians.
 
Learning Objectives
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Identify two ways to disclose pregnancy status/status of child to clients. Identify limitations in standardized assessment practices and considerations when interpreting test data as well as appropriate accommodations and modifications.
  2. Name two ways to manage transference/countertransference in the therapy room resulting from pregnancy disclosure.
  3. Identify three elements to consider in solo practice management when preparing for family (maternity/paternity) leave.
 
LATE AFTERNOON SESSION THREE, ROOM:  WATERS C
“ASD: Mental Health, Sexual Exploration & Internet Vulnerability”
Julie T. Steck, Ph.D., HSPP
David R. Parker, Ph.D.

1.5 Category I CE
 
Presentation Description
Social integration and sexual development are key aspects of normal human development.  However, social development and reciprocal interactions do not come easily or naturally to individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).  Thus, they do not have the typical social opportunities or experiences that those without ASD do.  Research has shown that those with ASD desire social contact and sexual intimacy.  More recent research suggests that there is a greater degree of sexual and gender diversity in those with ASD.  Much of the information that individuals gain about sexuality is obtained on the internet and many of their social interactions are via the internet.  The combination of sexual interest and desire with internet risks pose significant concerns for this group of individuals who are socially naïve and at high-risk for co-morbid mental health conditions. This presentation will focus on the state of research in this area and bridge that information to clinical and therapeutic interventions. 
In this presentation, attendees will learn about the historical significance of mass hysteria and the evolution of the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of somatic symptom and related disorders in children and adults. A physician, clinical health psychologist, clinical psychologist, and lifespan neuropsychologist will present and contribute to the conversation.
 
This introductory presentation has been developed for clinicians, residents, interns, and students.
 
Learning Objectives
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Identify the frequently co-occurring mental health conditions in individuals with ASD.
  2. Summarize the current research findings on sexual orientation and gender identity in the ASD population.
  3. Identify three ways to promote well-being through clinical treatment with those with ASD.

LATE AFTERNOON SESSION FOUR, ROOM:  WATERS D
“Worker’s Compensation: What a Psychologist Needs to Know to Conduct Evaluations and Treatment in Indiana”
Gregory T. Hale, Ph.D.
1.5 Category I CE
 
Program Description
Evaluating and treating injured workers occurs in a forensic context. Specific information about the structure of the Indiana Worker’s Compensation Board and system will be discussed. The participant will gain an understanding of how to navigate the demands of evaluating and treating injured workers. Case examples will be used to highlight the role of evaluating and treating psychologists.
 
This intermediate to advanced presentation has been developed for clinicians.

Learning Objectives
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Describe the structure of the Indiana Worker’s Compensation Board.
  2. Identify the issues pertinent to the evaluation and treatment of injured workers in the workers compensation context.
  3. Identify the psychological and behavioral issues affecting return to work and recovery following a work-related accident.  

SOCIAL GATHERING: 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3rd

STUDENT POSTER SET-UP: 7:00 AM - 7:30 AM, WATERS CONFERENCE CENTER LOBBY
REGISTRATION CHECK-IN & CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST: 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM, WATERS CONFERENCE CENTER LOBBY

EARLY MORNING CONCURRENT SESSIONS: 8:30 – 10:00
  
EARLY MORNING SESSION ONE, ROOM:  WATERS A
"So now what? Transitioning from Student to Clinician​"
Amanda Zelechoski, J.D., Ph.D., ABPP
1.5 Category I CE
 
Presentation Description
Though highly anticipated and exciting, the transition from classroom to clinical practice for many students and early career professionals can be daunting. This session will discuss a variety of common considerations and issues that often arise for emerging mental health professionals and strategies for preparation and success. The range of topics will include personal issues for new clinicians, such as confidence and imposter feelings, as well as practical considerations such as negotiating aspects of employment and protecting one’s professional practice.
 
This introductory presentation has been developed for clinicians, residents, interns, and students.
 
Learning Objectives
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Describe common fears and issues that arise for new clinicians.
  2. Summarize several strategies for mentally preparing for the transition from student to early career professional (ECP).
  3. Identify several practical considerations and strategies when pursuing employment opportunities.
 
EARLY MORNING SESSION TWO, ROOM:  WATERS B
“Introduction to MMPI-2-RF and the MMPI-A-RF”
Elizabeth Andresen, Ph.D., HSPP 
1.5 Category I CE
 
Presentation Description
The MMPI has been a staple of psychological and neuropsychological assessment for decades. Many psychologists have been using the MMPI-2 since its publication in 1989, and are hesitant to use the MMPI-2-RF due to the restructuring of the clinical scales and subsequent differences in interpretation. The MMPI-2-RF was published in 2008 and is actually very user-friendly once you are familiar with the new format and structure. The MMPI-3 is currently in development, and the developers have stated that it will be structured and interpreted like the -2-RF, not like the -2. This presentation will help psychologists begin to feel comfortable with the new restructured format before the release of the -3. 

This presentation will introduce psychologists to the MMPI-2-RF and MMPI-A-RF. We will discuss the history of the MMPI with a focus on what changed from the -2 to the 2-RF and why; the differences in validity scales, including the new validity scales and changes in the interpretative cutoffs; the higher-order scales; the substantive (previously called clinical) scales and how they relate to the traditional MMPI-2 scales; the specific problems scales and their similarities and differences from the Harris-Lingoes scales; the interest scales; and the personality pathology (PSY-5) scales. The MMPI-A-RF will also be briefly discussed, with a focus on the differences between the 2-RF and the A-RF. We will discuss scoring, the norms, the standard groups available for normative comparison on Q-global, and the interpretive reports available via that scoring software. A worksheet to guide interpretation will be provided to attendees, and we will interpret at least one protocol together as a group.

This introductory presentation has been developed for clinicians, residents, interns, and students.
 
Learning Objectives
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Summarize the history and evolution of the MMPI measures.
  2. Recognize the differences in the scales and structure of the current versions of the MMPI-2-RF and MMPI-A-RF as compared to the -2 and -A.
  3. Interpret an MMPI-2-RF protocol.

REFRESHMENT BREAK & VISIT POSTERS: 10:00 AM - 10:45 AM
LATE MORNING CONCURRENT SESSIONS: 10:45 AM – 12:15 PM
  
LATE MORNING SESSION ONE, ROOM:  WATERS A
"Managing risk as a new clinician: The Trust’s Trifecta"
Amanda Zelechoski, J.D., Ph.D., ABPP
1.5 Category I CE
 
Presentation Description
This session will provide an introduction to three basic risk management strategies that form the foundation of The Trust’s Risk Management Model. Participants will work through several case scenarios designed to highlight the importance of the informed consent process, good record-keeping practices, and when and how to seek consultation. In addition, this session will discuss the overlap and differences between risk management and professional ethics in clinical practice.
 
This introductory presentation has been developed for clinicians, residents, interns, and students.
 
Learning Objectives

By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Summarize the basic elements of good risk management in psychological practice.
  2. Describe several critical components of a comprehensive informed consent process.
  3. Summarize the primary purpose of maintaining clinical records.
  4. Identify several high-risk situations that may require consultation.

LATE MORNING SESSION TWO, ROOM:  WATERS B
“Pediatric Sleep: Common Issues and Interventions”
Kate Lyn Walsh, PsyD
1.5 Category I CE
 
Presentation Description
This presentation will first discuss the importance of sleep in pediatric populations, as well as the common issues that develop when children are sleep deprived and/or do not maintain a consistent and regular sleep schedule.  Presenter will also address the most common issues that parents report to pediatricians, and subsequently to behavioral sleep psychologists. The issues will include the need for parental intervention at bedtime (i.e. needing to be rocked or held to sleep), the inability to sleep independently at bedtime and/or throughout the night, and refusal to stay in bed at bedtime and throughout the night. This presentation will also briefly discuss common pediatric sleep disorders including sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome and delayed sleep phase disorder. Audience will learn when sleep disorders require medical versus behavioral interventions. Presenter will discuss common interventions such as cry-it-out and no-cry sleep solutions, as well as a brief overview of CBT-I.  Interventions specific to children will be presented, including using bedtime routines, bedtime passes, and a brave points program, amongst others. Finally, presentation will discuss the efficacy of behavioral sleep interventions with pediatric populations, including the recommended length and frequency of sessions to address common pediatric sleep disorders.

This introductory presentation has been developed for clinicians, residents, interns, and students.
 
Learning Objectives
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. List common behavioral sleep issues present in pediatric populations.
  2. List interventions to address the common behavioral sleep issues.
  3. Identify the importance of adequate sleep in pediatric populations and the negative consequences of sleep deprivation.
 
LUNCHEON & STUDENT POSTER AWARDS:  12:15 PM - 1:00 PM

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AFTERNOON CONCURRENT SESSIONS: 1:00 – 2:30 PM

AFTERNOON SESSION ONE, ROOM:  WATERS A
“Culturally Competent Clinical Practice”
Elizabeth Akey, Ph.D., HSPP
Hector De Los Santos, MS
Ankita Krishnan, MS

1.5 Category I CE
 
Presentation Description
APA guidelines provide several recommendations that are essential for culturally competent practice as psychologists, including developing awareness of one’s own biases and experiences, learning about the empirical work related to cultural values among culturally distinct populations, and recognizing culture-specific psychological factors associated with various cultural groups. This presentation will highlight some of the current research on recognizing and addressing implicit biases in professional practice and offer opportunities for participants to reflect on their current values and practices in relation to cultural competence.
 
This intermediate presentation has been developed for clinicians, researchers, residents, interns, and students.
 
Learning Objectives
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
  1. Recognize in some new or renewed way how their own cultural background and worldview influence the way they think about and interact with peers, colleagues, and clients.
  2. Comment on at least two aspects of current theoretical and empirical knowledge regarding how cultural and diversity interact with the professional activities of psychologists.
  3. Formulate at least one current step they can take to integrate and apply their increased personal awareness and empirical knowledge to their clinical practice and other professional roles.


AFTERNOON SESSION TWO, ROOM:  WATERS B
"Psychopharmacology:  Psychologists as Prescribers and Collaborators.  Exploring Opportunities for Psychologists to Provide High-quality Psychopharmacological Care From a Fundamentally Different Perspective. ”
Paula Neuman, Ed.D., PsyD, HSPP
1.5 Category I CE
 
Presentation Description
Beginning in the 1970’s, prescriptive authority has rapidly evolved into the non-physician health care disciplines. Nurse practitioners, optometrists, podiatrists, and physician assistants are among those professions who have seen a dramatic expansion of their scope of practice, largely due to the ability to prescribe medications.  Psychologists are among the only doctoral-level providers who do not universally have the authority to prescribe drugs. Prescriptive authority offers the opportunity to psychologists to address comprehensive unmet health care needs.  Evidenced based studies continue to clearly suggest that properly trained psychologists not only are quality prescriptive providers, they are uniquely positioned to raise the standard of health care treatment as a viable and alternative to traditional medically dominated mental health care.  Several graduate programs have implemented or are developing prescriptive training.  Several states have recently passed legislation and are implementing psychology prescribing laws.  Learn why it is time for Indiana to move forward in the future of comprehensive mental health care services.  
 
This intermediate presentation has been developed for clinicians, researchers, residents, interns, and students. .
 
Learning Objectives
By attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Summarize Indiana's current law regarding prescriptive-authority.
  2. Describe progress being made, along with APA's leadership, in the national movement for prescribing psychologists.
  3. Utilize literature that supports and does not support prescriptive-authority for psychologists, and to assess literature that addresses implications of prescribing for psychologists.
  4. Prepare to become involved in public policy as momentum grows in Indiana. 
 
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SPECIAL NOTE TO CONFERENCE ATTENDEES
The Indiana Psychological Association (IPA) is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Indiana Psychological Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • Indiana State Psychology Board and Indiana Behavioral Health Board: IPA is an approved provider of Category I continuing education for psychologists. IPA is an approved provider of Category I continuing education for LSW, LCSW, LMFT, LMHC, LMFTA, LCAC and LAC.
  • Licensees must judge the program’s relevance to their professional practice.
Please note that APA rules require that credit be given only to those who attend the entire workshop(s). Those arriving more than 15 minutes after the scheduled start time or leaving early will not receive CE credits. Partial credit cannot be given.
 
All licensees requesting Category I CE credits will receive a certificate from IPA confirming the number of credits earned. These certificates will be delivered via email approximately 2-6 weeks after the conference.


Presenter Biographies (PDF)

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CONFERENCE LOCATION

Embassy Suites by Hilton Indianapolis Noblesville
13700 Conference Center Drive South
Noblesville, IN 46060
Phone: (317) 674-1900
Online Reservations
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REGISTRATION
Registration includes a light continental breakfast, lunch, and social gathering hors d'Oeurves (Friday).
 
Cancellation/Refund Policy: IPA will provide refunds for registration cancellations made at least 10 days before the event minus a $25 cancellation fee.  No refunds will be given for cancellations fewer than 10 days before an event.
 
Early Bird Pricing in BOLD; Ends October 15th

Members must login (through Registration link) to receive the Members discount.

Non-members:  Submit membership application online for membership in October, then pay dues upon acceptance to register for the Fall Conference at the Member discounted rate (save $145 on 2018 Fall Conference).  Contact the IPA office for details at (317)257-7449 or contact Connie Vore at -admin@indianapsychology.org.
Early Bird Pricing in BOLD*; ending soon!
MEMBERS: Friday Only
$210 IPA Members*
$230 IPA Members
$165 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)*
$185 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)
 
MEMBERS: Saturday Only
$170 IPA Members*
$190 IPA Members
$135 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)*
$155 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)
 
MEMBERS: Friday & Saturday
$285 IPA Members*
$310 IPA Members
$275 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)*
$295 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)
 
NON-MEMBERS: Friday Only
$355 Psychologists & Other Professionals*
$375 Psychologists & Other Professionals
$310 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)*
$330 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)
 
NON-MEMBERS: Saturday Only
$315 Psychologists & Other Professionals*
$335 Psychologists & Other Professionals
$280 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)*
$300 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)
 
NON-MEMBERS: Friday & Saturday
$430 Psychologists & Other Professionals*
$455 Psychologists & Other Professionals
$420 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)*
$440 Early Career Psychologists (≤ 10 years)
 
STUDENTS: Prices for One or Two Days
ONE DAY
$45 Members*
$55 Members
$80 Non-Members*
$90 Non-Members
 
TWO DAYS
$50 Members*
$60 Members
$85 Non-Members*
$95 Non-Members

Early Bird Pricing in BOLD*; ending soon!

Non-Members:  Submit membership application online for membership in October, then pay dues upon acceptance to register for the Fall Conference at the Member discounted rate (save $145 on 2018 Fall Conference).  Contact the IPA office for details at (317)257-7449 or contact Connie Vore at admin@indianapsychology.org.

Members must login (through Registration link) to receive the Members discount.

If you are interested in exhibiting at the Conference, contact  info@indianapsychology.org.

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Location: Embassy Suites by Hilton Indianapolis Noblesville, IN
13700 Conference Center Drive South
Noblesville, IN 46060

Registration ends on November 2, 2018



CANCELLATION/REFUND POLICY
IPA will provide refunds for registration cancellations made at least 10 days before the event minus a $25 cancellation fee. No refunds will be given for cancellations fewer than 10 days before an event.

Early Bird Pricing Ends October 13th.